How to use a mobile phone in Vietnam in 5 easy steps!

Cell phones are an essential part of travel nowadays.  Whether it be for calling home, calling hotels, planning logistics, map surfing, navigating, or Facebook-ing, your cell phone is the one-stop resource for it all.  Of course, every country has their own system, so for your stay in Vietnam, we have put together a simple 5-step process in understanding the ins and outs of cell phone usage.

5 steps to using a cell phone

1.  THINK ABOUT YOUR PHONE

You have three options: bring an locked phone with you, bring an unlocked phone with you, or buy a relatively cheap phone here.  If you bring a locked phone, make sure you understand the terms for international roaming.  With an unlocked phone or a phone that you buy here, you can simply purchase a SIM card and have a local number.  Keep in mind that the unlocked phone that you bring must be a GSM phone, but most phones are these days.  Smart phones are beneficial here because you can have access to the 3G network.

2.  FIND A SIM CARD

There are stalls, stores, booths, carts and even bicycles that will sell SIM cards the minute that you land in Vietnam (we are not exaggerating… there are establishments in and around the airport!).  If you can wait a bit, ask the staff at your hotel or hostel to point you towards the nearest telecommunications store.  The associates at the store will provide a SIM card for you, cut the card according to your phone and install it for you.  For the best coverage, ensure that the SIM card you get is either on the Viettel, Mobifone or Vinafone networks.  These three companies control 90% of the mobile market in Vietnam and offer great coverage throughout the country.  Before you walk out of the store, make sure you check that the phone works.

Alternatively, check out this service – www.simcardasia.com.  They will send you a SIM Card in the mail before your trip so that you can pass on your temporary number to family and friends before embarking on your journey.  For Vietnam, the SIM Card they provide to you is on the Viettel network.

3.  SET UP 3G

Fortunately, the three top mobile companies also provide decent 3G service in Vietnam.  Having 3G can be extremely beneficial to navigate around, especially since Google Maps works very well in the cities.  More importantly, you can be in constant touch with the outside world via Facebook, Twitter, or social outlet of your choice!  And if you find yourself in a bind, you can access our XO Tours blog for travel advice on the go!  The set up is a little bit tricky but not difficult.  The basic procedure is the same for all companies but the details might differ.  In general, you will have to send a text message along the lines of “3G ON” to a special network number (eg. *888) and then configure your phone’s settings, but many mobile stores will do it for you.  If not, they will give you the detailed procedure so you can do it on your own.

4.  UNDERSTAND THE USAGE RULES

There are very few differences between the companies as to how much local calls, international calls and text messages cost, and they are quite low.  To give you an idea, on Mobifone, a phone call to a cell phone on another network is 1800VND/min and an international text message is 2500VND/text.  The exact details can be found on their respective websites.

The initial SIM Card that you purchase will come with pre-paid minutes in a denomination that you choose.  It will also come with an expiration so choose wisely.  For instance, the 100,000 VND card may expire in 7 days and the 200,000 VND card may expire in 30 days.  If you plan on being in Vietnam for around 1 month, it might be beneficial to choose the option that spans the entire time you will be here.  Topping up your minutes is also quite easy.  In order to top up, you can purchase a minutes card that looks like a ‘scratch-n-win’ card in any denomination that you want.  When you scratch the card, it will reveal a 12 digit activation card.  Then, simply enter *100*code# and ‘Send’.  You will get a message instantly saying that your minutes have been topped up.  Dial *101# to check your balance as you go.

5.  UNDERSTAND THE PHONE NUMBERS

Once you have your phone ready to go, you will need to know how to dial phone numbers here as it may be different than what you are used to.  Here are the basics –

Country Code: + 84

Trunk Prefix: 0

International Prefix: 00

Land Line format:  Area Code (1 to 3 digits) + Phone Number (5 to 8 digits)

Cell Phone format: 09y xxx-xxxx or 01yy xxx-xxxx

FROM: Land Line  TO: Local Land Line

Area Code + Phone Number

FROM: Land Line  TO: Cell Phone

09y xxx-xxxx or 01yy xxx-xxxx

FROM: Cell Phone  TO: Land Line

0 + Area Code + Phone Number

FROM: Cell Phone  TO: Cell Phone

09y xxx-xxxx or 01yy xxx-xxxx

FROM: Anything  TO: International Phone Number

00 + Country Code + (Area Code + Phone Number) or (Cell Phone format)

 

We hope you found this Vietnam travel tip useful!  To find more useful information about XO Tours and Vietnam, take a look at our FAQ section!

Vantage Point: The Location for the Extraordinary Photo!

The skyline of Saigon at night

The skyline of Saigon at night

Ho Chi Minh City is a unique city in that it is rapidly growing but has yet to develop into a massive skyscraper filled concrete jungle.  While it is transforming into a cosmopolitan world city, it still retains some of its old world charm.  The city is rich with nooks and crannies, alleyways and narrow motorbike-filled roads, and areas unexplored by the majority of tourists, making it a very different type of place to explore.  These features of Ho Chi Minh City make it a veritable playground for photography enthusiasts because you can take pictures here that will be distinctly unique.  The irony is that this also makes it difficult to find the perfect spots to capture those exotic moments.  We have compiled a simple guide to finding the best vantage points in Ho Chi Minh City to inspire your urban photography.

LANDSCAPE

Even though the city has little to offer in terms of mountains and oceans, the topography is unique enough to create a beautiful silhouette.  The Saigon River offers an interesting perspective for photographers because there are many spots along the river where one can look back and see the skyline or simply appreciate the sunrise and sunset.

Vantage Point:  For a great shot of the complete skyline, go to either the Kinh Te or Thu Thiem bridge.  Sunset is usually around 6 pm in the evening so try and catch the sun setting on the city!  Note that the Bitexco Tower is the tallest building in the city and although it has a viewing deck on one of it’s upper floors, the skyline seems underwhelming from this perspective.

The Saigon Sunset

The Saigon Sunset

If you are more a fan of greener landscapes, you will have to venture a bit outside of the city but fortunately not too far away.  One of the most popular places for wedding photographs around the city is a theme park of sorts, called Binh Quoi 1.  The Binh Quoi Village is lush and green, and it has waterways with traditional boats and boatsmen.  If you go at the right time, you may even see couples taking wedding shots.

Vantage point:  Find the pond with lilies and a water wheel or look for a spot along the water with huts and parked rowboats for a more authentic look in a fabricated paradise.

Lily pads at Binh Quoi Village

Lily pads at Binh Quoi Village

The scenery at Binh Quoi Village

The scenery at Binh Quoi Village

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARCHITECTURE

Ho Chi Minh City has some very interesting buildings.  Sure, they are not the sky reaching structures that you see elsewhere, but they are marvelous nonetheless.  The city has its fair share of old buildings that have been maintained pristinely since the French Colonial Era in Vietnam.  They hold such history and meaning, you can feel the aura of years gone by.

Vantage point:  The Notre Dame Cathedral is one of the most beautiful colonial era buildings.  Walk to the side of the building to the massive doors – they make for a cool backdrop for portrait shots!  If it happens to rain one evening, go to the City Hall in Saigon.  The way the blue lights shine off the wet pavement and reflects onto the building makes it looks mystical!  And if you go to the historical Post Office, look up!  The ceiling is an architectural masterpiece.

The City Hall glowing blue after a heavy rain.

The City Hall glowing blue after a heavy rain.

The majestic ceiling of the main Post Office.

The majestic ceiling of the main Post Office.

The city is filled with juxtapositions, especially the old with the new.  But there isn’t just one kind of old.  Next to the colonial buildings are the ages old pagodas and temples.  They offer a history of their own.  Many of them have been there since before the war, and some of them even damaged and then subsequently restored.

Vantage point: Jade Emperor Pagoda is one of the most impressive pagodas, architecturally.  But the Thien Hau Pagoda has a ceiling full of cone shaped incense burners that make for a very interesting photograph.  The many pagodas around the city also look the most magical under a haze of incense smoke – find out at what time of the day most people visit the pagoda to maximize the amount of smoke in the air!

Cone-shaped incense burners on the ceiling of the Pagoda.

Cone-shaped incense burners on the ceiling of the Pagoda.

Incense burning outside the Jade Emperor Pagoda

Incense burning outside the Jade Emperor Pagoda

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CITY LIFE

The one thing that this city most definitely does not lack is the ever-moving, awe-inspiring, and at times hair-raising activity.  The people, the food and the culture are so vibrant that it is a privilege to be able to capture it on camera.  The most well known feature of Ho Chi Minh City is the traffic.  The streets are jam-packed with motorbikes – in fact, the cities in Vietnam have the highest number of motorbikes per capita in the world!

Vantage point:  Early in the morning, take a trip out to District 5 near Cho Lon.  This is where you see the motorbikes carrying the craziest things, like washing machines or giant panes of glass!  In the evening, go up to the Chill Skybar rooftop restaurant and look down onto the circle intersection below in front of Ben Thanh market.  A time lapse photo of the motorbikes zipping around the circle will capture the chaos on the roads at night!

A really cool time lapse photo taken from the top of Chill Skybar overlooking the circle outside Ben Thanh market.

A really cool time lapse photo taken from the top of Chill Skybar overlooking the circle outside Ben Thanh market.

You cannot come to Vietnam and be absolutely enamoured by the people.  Vietnamese people work hard but still take time to relax and enjoy themselves.  One of the most charming sights is seeing a Vietnamese woman dressed in an Ao Dai and sauntering down the street or and elderly person finding some shade under a conical hat.  In the evenings, locals come out in full force to spend time with friends at the local watering holes or the coffee shops (yes, coffee joints were cool here long before they became popular in the rest of the world)!

Vantage point: As you’re walking around the city, take a look inside the alleyways.  They are more than just a narrow passing.  You’ll see food stalls, parked bikes, people lounging, and more!  If you’re taking a picture of a person though, ask their permission first.  Most people don’t mind but be sure to show them the photo afterwards to put a smile on their face. 🙂

An alley riddled with flags of Vietnam.

An alley riddled with flags of Vietnam.

Quiet alley with beautiful doors on either side.

Quiet alley with beautiful doors on either side.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We hope you enjoyed this Vietnam Travel Tip from XO Tours, offering the most unique city and food tours in Saigon!

What NOT to bring to Vietnam

We recently posted about the items you should bring with you when visiting Vietnam.  We thought it would be fitting to also tell you about the items you should not bring with you!  Here is a short list to guide you when packing for the trip and to remind you of the import rules in Vietnam.

1. The Obvious – We hope that the point we are making here is assumed, but to reiterate – please do not bring illegal drugs (yes, this includes cannabis) and weapons to Vietnam.  If you are caught with illegal drugs or weapons, the repercussions are not pretty!

2. Anti-Government Propaganda – Although we highly recommend learning about Vietnam’s history and culture before coming here, we do not recommend bringing some of these reading materials to Vietnam.  If they contain any material that one would consider to be against the current government, they will be confiscated and you will be heavily reprimanded.  What’s more, if you bring any printed maps, make sure that the map labels the giant body of water next to Vietnam as ‘Eastern Sea’, not ‘South China Sea’! 🙂

The body of water directly east of Vietnam is referred to as the Eastern Sea rather than South China Sea.  Any maps that label it as South China Sea are prohibited.

The body of water directly east of Vietnam is referred to as the Eastern Sea rather than South China Sea. Any maps that label it as South China Sea are prohibited.

3. Heavy or Excess Items – As we mentioned in our previous blog post, internal flights seem cheap at first but they really make their money on excess baggage fees.  If you can do without heavy items such as hair dryers or even heavy-shelled bags, you may save yourself a lot of money!  Also avoid bringing an excess of common hygiene products like toothpaste, soap, shampoo, etc.  If you happen to run out during your trip, you can find all these items here, and most brand names are available.

4. Expensive Items – Thieves in Vietnam can be masters of their art.  If you flaunt that real gold necklace or diamond pendant while roaming the motorbike-saturated streets, it may get snatched before you even realize what has happened!  It really is best to leave your expensive jewelry back home to avoid theft.  Although rings are more difficult to steal, you still have to use caution.  Women do wear their wedding rings routinely here without a problem but you will have to be very aware of your surroundings.

With hoards of motorcycles around the city, if someone was to snatch your necklace and speed away, you wouldn't even know who to chase down!

With hoards of motorcycles around the city, if someone was to snatch your necklace and speed away, you wouldn’t even know who to chase down!

We do not recommend that you bring expensive electronic items, but if you must bring them, be extremely careful.  For the photography enthusiasts, professional cameras can be very useful here as Vietnam offers an amazing backdrop for your photos.  However, we advise you to have straps for your camera that are really thick and to keep it strapped across your body or wrist.  PacSafe makes bags for cameras that is reinforced with steel wire so it cannot be cut.  As for phones, many people have had their phone stolen right from under them as they write a text message or look at maps.  Have someone cover if you if you need to use your phone on the streets and stand facing inwards rather than towards the street.  Otherwise, keep it in a pocket with zippers.

PacSafe makes camera bags that are very theft-proof.  The straps and the body of the bag contain a thick wire mesh that prevents anyone from cutting the bag open.

PacSafe makes camera bags that are very theft-proof. The straps and the body of the bag contain a thick wire mesh that prevents anyone from cutting the bag open.

5. Pornography – The sale or possession of any pornographic material is strictly prohibited and illegal in Vietnam, not just for tourists but for everyone.  Enforcement is very strict!  If you happen to have unlabeled DVDs in your bag, they will be checked at the airport.  Please note that pornography is illegal in most of Southeast Asia but more easily obtainable in some of the neighbouring countries.  If you are traveling around Asia, you will have to get rid of any pornographic material in your possession before entering Vietnam.

This is another great travel tip brought to you by XO Tours, the complete Vietnam travel resource!

Try to Wear This Hat Backwards!

Our XO Tours ladies wearing their traditional Ao Dai and Non La.

Our XO Tours ladies wearing their traditional Ao Dai and Non La.

Nothing portrays iconic Vietnamese fashion more than the long flowy dress and the conical hat, otherwise known as the Ao Dai and the Non La.  To many, it may just seem like a hat people wear in this part of the world, but the non la is more than just a functional headpiece – it’s a symbol of Vietnamese history, art and culture.  But how much do you really know about the conical hat?  In fact, many tourists see the hat worn everyday and even buy it as a souvenir, but as we said before, it’s more than just a hat!  Let us tell you a bit about what the conical hat truly represents and enrich your cultural knowledge of Vietnam.

The Trong Dong Ngoc Lu drum with intricate carvings depicting characters wearing the conical hat.

The Trong Dong Ngoc Lu drum with intricate carvings depicting characters wearing the conical hat.

A Brief History

The exact origin of the non la is hard to pinpoint but legends and stories dating back thousands of years talk about the conical hat.  The hat is depicted as a drawing on two famous ancient relics, the Trong Dong Ngoc Lu (a drum with an intricate pattern carved onto it) and the Thap Dong Dao Thinh (a decorated bronze jar from the Dong Son people).  Both these relics are between 2500 to 3000 years old, indicating that the non la is at least that old, if not older.  What is for certain is that the hat has been an essential part of Vietnamese culture.  Farmers to labourers to ordinary men and women have been using it for utilitarian purposes and will continue to use it for many years to come.

 

What’s it for?

Vietnam is a sub-tropical country so it gets quite hot – upwards of 40 C in the summer!  The hat provides good protection from the sun and heat.  During the rainy season, the hat is a good shield for the rain.  Farmers often wear it when they are in the sun for extended periods of time.  But nowadays, it’s also a fashionable accessory and a great souvenir!

People aren't the only ones that wear the 'non la' in their everyday lives. :)

People aren’t the only ones that wear the ‘non la’ in their everyday lives. 🙂

How’s it Made

You may find the design very simple, but the construction is far from it.  Remarkably, all the conical hats in the world are hand made!  There is no machine dextrous enough to create this work of art.  The hat is made from two materials – bamboo and the leaves of palm trees.  The frame is made from 16 concentric rings (after much research, 16 has been found to be the magic number!) joined by perpendicular bars of bamboo.  The leaves are then sun-dried, ironed very strategically, and then precisely sewn and woven into the frame.  The needlework required to make the non la is also very intricate and takes years of experience, not to mention extreme patience and dextrous hands.  There are entire villages in the northern part of Vietnam where every person in the village is dedicated to the manufacturing of conical hats!

Workers in the Chuong village creating the hats by hand.

Workers in the Chuong village creating the hats by hand.

Regional Variations

As if the construction of the hat wasn’t complicated enough, hat makers have found ways to make it even more intricate.  Specific regions have their own way of making the hat unique.  For instance, the people from the Lai Chau region make their hats flatter than the regular non la.  In our opinion, the most beautiful variation of the non la comes from the Hue region.  Hue is the ancient capital of Vietnam and is an incredibly romantic and artistic city.  It is the birthplace of many famous Vietnamese poets.  So it’s only fitting that there are verses of poetry inserted between the layers of leaves as a sunken design so the words are only visible in sunlight!

Beautiful 'non bai tho' with poetry and images imbedded within the leaf layers, visible only in sunlight.

Beautiful ‘non bai tho’ with poetry and images imbedded within the leaf layers, visible only in sunlight.

The conical hats in the Lai Chau region are a variation on the regular 'non la' shape.

The conical hats in the Lai Chau region are a variation on the regular ‘non la’ shape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some things you should definitely know…

  • The non la is a serious fashion statement on the runways.  Designs like Ralph Lauren and Louis Vuitton have used the conical hat in their shows!

    Many fashion designers have used the hat in Asian-inspired shows on the runway, and supermodel Kate Moss wore it in a magazine shoot!

    Many fashion designers have used the hat in Asian-inspired shows on the runway, and supermodel Kate Moss wore it in a magazine shoot!

  • The fashion trend has now trickled down to mainstream stores!  American Apparel sells the hats (paddy hats, as they call it) for only $15.99. 🙂

    Far away from Vietnam, ordinary people have taken up the trend!

    Far away from Vietnam, ordinary people have taken up the trend!

  • If you’re wondering how one would store such a unique shaped hat, you can purchase this beautiful case for it, which just happens to be 10 times the cost of the hat that goes in it!

    A beautiful leather hand crafted box to store your palm leaf hat!

    A beautiful leather hand crafted box to store your palm leaf hat!

  • Celebrities just love it!  Even Lady Gaga has invented a very unique interpretation of the conical hat. 🙂

    The one and only Lady Gaga recently wore the 'non la' during a public appearance, but of course she put her own spin on it.

    The one and only Lady Gaga recently wore the ‘non la’ during a public appearance, but of course she put her own spin on it.

This is another fun snapshot of Vietnamese culture brought to you by XO Tours, the most talked about motorbike tour company in the media!

How to avoid getting sick while eating and traveling in Vietnam

One of the fastest ways to ruin a vacation is by falling sick!  As a traveler in a new country, it can be difficult to know what to eat, what to drink, and how to go about your activities while staying as healthy as possible.  Here are some great tips on how to stay healthy during your time in Vietnam.

FOOD AND WATER

Drinking Water
As a traveler, water safety is a very serious issue.  Like many other countries, Vietnam has an underdeveloped water treatment infrastructure in place.  Contaminated water is a major source of illness so it’s very important to understand what you are getting into.

  • In Vietnam, avoid tap water as much as possible and only drink bottled water.  Generally, even locals will avoid tap water and will drink boiled or filtered water at home.  Bottled water is almost always available at restaurants.
  • If you want to drink something refreshing at a restaurant other than water, an alternative is iced tea (“tra da”, pronounced “cha da”), which is cold green tea with ice.  Since it is a tea, it has been steeped in boiling water and then cooled, thereby killing any critters that may make you sick.  Most locals will drink ‘tra da’ at restaurants over water simply because it’s safe, more refreshing than lukewarm water, and cheaper than anything bottled!
  • As for the ice, use your judgement.  Yes, ice outside may not be safe because it may have been made with contaminated water.  However, a lot restaurants buy ice from companies rather than manufacture it themselves, in which case it is quite safe.   Many people, both locals and foreigners, are able to enjoy drinks with ice in them without consequence.

Food
Food-borne illness is also a major concern for a traveler, so the food you eat should be hot and completely cooked!

  • Soup-like dishes are ubiquitous in Vietnamese cuisine so there are many opportunities to contract some sort of illness.  Make sure that the pho that you order is piping hot!
  • Eat only cooked foods and steer away from raw meats.  Although many sushi restaurants will prepare the fish properly, it is not worth the risk if you are only here for a short time.
  • Even eating salads and raw vegetables is not the best idea.  Adding raw herbs to your hot pho is usually fine but again, you will have to use your judgement.  Note that restaurants will flash boil the raw vegetables and herbs for you at your request.
  • Be cautious of fruit – eat fruits that have an inedible skin (i.e. bananas, oranges, watermelon, etc.) and avoid fruits like apples and sugar cane.

Street Food

A lot of travelers ask about street food.  Is it safe to eat?  Will I get sick?  The answer is not so simple.  For instance, our XO Tours Foodie Tour takes you to street stalls and open air restaurants where the food quality and safety procedures have been thoroughly scrutinized and held to high standards.  Here are some things that may help make your decision when considering other street food stalls.

  • The turnover and volume at the street stall is an important consideration.  The more people who frequent a stall, the more fresh the food will be.  A lot of these stalls do not have a means for refrigeration so they seldom prepare food ahead of time.  As an example, the stalls inside Ben Thanh market serve a very high volume of customers so a lot of their prepared food gets consumed on the day they make it.  That is not to say that you will avoid getting sick but the risk is less.

    The food stalls in Ben Thanh market sees hundreds of visitors a day so they tend to go through their food quite quickly in comparison to other food stalls around the city.

    The food stalls in Ben Thanh market sees hundreds of visitors a day so they tend to go through their food quite quickly in comparison to other food stalls around the city.

  • You can also observe the hygiene at the street stall you are considering.  In many cases, you can see your food being made and if it’s not up to your standards, it is not worth the risk.
  • Be observant of the vessels they use.  If you see them wash the bowls or plates in tap water and they are still wet when putting your food in it, maybe this isn’t the street stall for you.  For this very reason, “banh mi” (Vietnamese sandwich) is one the safest street stall foods you can eat because there are no vessels or utensils involved!
  • If you really want to eat street food during your time in Vietnam, reviews from other travelers may be a good source – if many people go to a particular establishment and none of them have become ill, you may get lucky as well!

ENVIRONMENT

Air Pollution
Ho Chi Minh City is not overly polluted but you can still feel the difference in air quality when compared to other cities around the world.  Protection against air pollution is a must when your body simply isn’t accustomed to it.

  • If you are spending a lot of time on a bike, you may want to don a mask to protect against dust and pollution.  This is useful if you are going to spend several hours on a bike on a regular basis such as long rides across the country.  For shorter bike rides like on any of the tours offered by XO Tours, you will be just fine without one.
  • Pollution and dust can also affect your eyes so definitely wear sunglasses or goggles on these long rides because your eyes can start to burn.

 

Many motorbike riders in Vietnam wear masks to protect against dust and pollution.

Many motorbike riders in Vietnam wear masks to protect against dust and pollution.

Tap Water

As trivial as it may sound, many people get concerned about how to brush their teeth and if tap water is safe for brushing.  As we discussed earlier, tap water may be contaminated so it is not safe to ingest.  Here are tips on how you can go out this everyday task and still stay safe.

  • If you are in Vietnam for a short time, it is not worth getting sick so we would recommend using bottled water to brush or no water at all to brush your teeth.
  • For extended stays, brushing your teeth with tap water is said to be a good way to get used to the local bacterial fauna.  Many tourists brush their teeth with tap water successfully without getting sick.  Again, this is only worth it if you will stay in Vietnam for a longer period of time.
  • You may also want to check at the front desk of where you are staying because many of the higher end hotels have an internal filtration system.  Keep in mind that the goal of this filtration is not to make the tap water safe for drinking but marginally better so that small tasks like brushing your teeth are hassle free.

Sun and Insects
With much of Asia being in a tropical climate, it is important to consider sun safety and insect protection.

  • The sun rays are very potent so please protect yourself with the use of a hat and strong sunscreen.
  • As for insect transmitted diseases, malaria and dengue fever are the two you should educate yourself about.  In Vietnam the prevalence of malaria is contained to rural areas but dengue fever is more common throughout the country.  Both are transmitted by mosquitos so an insect spray that contains DEET is a must!

Stray Animals
One feature about Vietnam you may find different than other countries is the number of stray animals.  As you travel around, you’ll see dogs, cats, chickens and more.  An incredibly important point for you to be aware of is that Vietnam is not a rabies-free country.  Besides rabies, there are many diseases transmitted through animals.

  • Simply steer clear!
  • It is imperative that you do not touch or pet any of the stray animals, no matter how cute they are!

    Stray animals are commonly found out and about on the streets, but it is best to not pet them or come into contact with them.

    Stray animals are commonly found out and about on the streets, but it is best to not pet them or come into contact with them.

This is another great travel tip brought to you by XO Tours, the safest motorbike tour in Vietnam!